First-Year Courses 2017-18

The standard department handbook is The Broadview Pocket Guide to Writing (fourth edition).

View Course Timetable


FALL 2016

NumberCourse DescriptionsProfessor
ENGL 115 University Writing and Research Multiple Sections
ENGL 125 Literature and Culture Multiple Sections
ENGL 135 Literature and Criticism Multiple Sections
INTR 100 Popular Culture and University Writing (6 credits: includes ENGL 115) Doug Stetar & Nelson Gray
INTR 103 World Regional Geographies and University Writing (6 credits: includes ENGL 115) Terri Doughty & Pam Shaw


SPRING 2017

NumberCourse DescriptionsProfessor
ENGL 115 University Writing & Research Multiple Sections
ENGL 125 Literature and Culture Multiple Sections
ENGL 135 Literature and Criticism Multiple Sections
INTR 100 Popular Culture and University Writing (6 credits: includes ENGL 115) Nelson Gray & Doug Stetar
INTR 101 Digital Media and Literature (6 credits: includes ENGL 125)  Doug Stetar & Daniel Burgoyne

Course Descriptions


FALL 2016 ENGL 115: UNIVERSITY WRITING AND RESEARCH

Multiple sections
An introduction to critical thinking and reading, academic writing, and research skills, consistent with the conditions and expectations students encounter as readers and writers at university.

All sections include an in-class essay, a research essay, and a final examination.

There are multiple sections of this course. See the Course Timetable for descriptions of individual sections.


FALL 2016 ENGL 125: LITERATURE AND CULTURE

Multiple sections
An introduction to the concept of literary genres that explores the relationship between literature and its historical and cultural contexts. This course emphasizes reading, research, and writing.

All sections include an in-class essay, a research essay, and a final examination.

There are multiple sections of this course. See the Course Timetable for descriptions of individual sections.


FALL 2016 ENGL 135: LITERATURE AND CRITICISM

Multiple sections

An introduction to different ways of approaching and analyzing literary works to develop an awareness of the relation between literature and criticism. This course emphasizes reading, research, and writing.

Note that all sections include an in-class essay, a research essay, and a final examination.

There are multiple sections of this course. See the Course Timetable for descriptions of individual sections.


FALL 2016 INTR 100: POPULAR CULTURE AND UNIVERSITY WRITING (6 CREDITS)

Section F15N01 

IdeologyProfessors Doug Stetar & Nelson Gray

What is popular culture? If you grew up trading Pokémon cards, watching The Simpsons, reading Twilight, or skateboarding, the answer to this question might seem obvious. You could point at a skate park or a television or bring us posters peeled off your bedroom walls. How do you feel about pop culture? Is it trash or something more? How does it connect to other aspects of your life—like your relationships or your job? Does it really affect how you see the world or yourself? You already know that people constantly write about pop culture—you’ve read magazines and blogs or discussion forums—but do you know that researchers at universities also study and write about pop culture? This course will provide an integrated introduction to the study of pop culture and university writing and research.

A combination of ENGL 115 and MEDI 112 in an integrated learning environment: Students will explore the core concepts of popular culture and university writing and research. Readings, assignments, and assessment will be shared in an interdisciplinary environment. Note: students will receive course exemption for ENGL 115 (3 credits) and MEDI 112 (3 credits) upon completion. This course fulfils 3 credits of the Degree English Requirement. (6 credits).

Enrol in either the Fall (F16N01) or the Spring (S17N01) section.


FALL 2016 INTR 103: WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHIES AND UNIVERSITY WRITING (6 CREDITS)

INTR 103Professors Pam Shaw and Terri Doughty

Students will be introduced to the major regions of the world, with an emphasis on globalization and inter-regional linkages that affect the lives of people around the world.  Some assignments will require students to explore crossing cultural boundaries and to think about how culture shapes the spaces in which we live. This is an integrated course, so writing activities and assignments will be related to the course readings in cultural geography.   The team-taught course will blend lecture, discussion, and work-shopping, with some online course content.

There will be a summary/synthesis assignment, a midterm, a library assignment (research question + annotated bibliography), a research paper, a report on a cultural event, and a final exam.

This 6-credit course is equivalent to both GEOG 100 and ENGL 115 and provides 3 credits toward meeting the Degree English Requirement.

Readings:

  • Pulsipher and Pulsipher (2014) World Regional Geography: Global Patterns, Local Lives, 6th ed.
  • Selection of short essays (avail. online)
  • Giltrow et al. (2014) Academic Writing: An Introduction, 3rd ed.
  • Babington et al. (2015) Broadview Pocket Guide to Writing, 4th ed.

The class will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:30-2:30.


SPRING 2017 ENGL 115: UNIVERSITY WRITING AND RESEARCH

Multiple sections

An introduction to critical thinking and reading, academic writing, and research skills, consistent with the conditions and expectations students encounter as readers and writers at university.

Note that all sections include an in-class essay, a research essay, and a final examination.

See the Course Timetable for descriptions of individual sections.


SPRING 2017 ENGL 125: LITERATURE AND CULTURE

Multiple sections

An introduction to the concept of literary genres that explores the relationship between literature and its historical and cultural contexts. This course emphasizes reading, research, and writing.

Note that all sections include an in-class essay, a research essay, and a final examination.

There are multiple sections of this course. See the Course Timetable for descriptions of individual sections.


SPRING 2017 ENGL 135: LITERATURE AND CRITICISM

Multiple sections
An introduction to different ways of approaching and analyzing literary works to develop an awareness of the relation between literature and criticism. This course emphasizes reading, research, and writing.

Note that all sections include an in-class essay, a research essay, and a final examination.

There are multiple sections of this course. See the Course Timetable for descriptions of individual sections.


SPRING 2017 INTR 100: POPULAR CULTURE  UNIVERSITY WRITING & RESEARCH

IdeologySection S17N01

Professors Doug Stetar & Nelson Gray

What is popular culture? If you grew up trading Pokémon cards, watching The Simpsons, reading Twilight, or skateboarding, the answer to this question might seem obvious. You could point at a skate park or a television or bring us posters peeled off your bedroom walls. How do you feel about pop culture? Is it trash or something more? How does it connect to other aspects of your life—like your relationships or your job? Does it really affect how you see the world or yourself? You already know that people constantly write about pop culture—you’ve read magazines and blogs or discussion forums—but do you know that researchers at universities also study and write about pop culture? This course will provide an integrated introduction to the study of pop culture and university writing and research.

A combination of ENGL 115 and MEDI 112 in an integrated learning environment: Students will explore the core concepts of popular culture and university writing and research. Readings, assignments, and assessment will be shared in an interdisciplinary environment. Note: students will receive course exemption for ENGL 115 (3 credits) and MEDI 112 (3 credits) upon completion. This course fulfils 3 credits of the Degree English Requirement. (6 credits).

Enrol in either the Fall (F16N01) or the Spring (S17N01) section.


SPRING 2017 INTR 101: DIGITAL MEDIA AND LITERATURE

Section S17N01

Professors Daniel Burgoyne & Doug Stetar

Combines ENGL 125 and DIGI 110 in an integrated learning environment. Students will explore the relation between literature and digital media and their historical and cultural contexts. This course emphasizes reading, research, writing, and introductory digital media skills. Readings, assignments, and assessment will be shared in an interdisciplinary environment. Note: Students will receive course exemption for DIGI 110 and ENGL 125 upon completion.

Note: students will receive course exemption for ENGL 125 (3 credits) and DIGI 110 (3 credits) upon completion. This course fulfils 3 credits of the Degree English Requirement. (6 credits).

Prerequisite: Min. “C” in English 12 or equivalent.

 


IMPORTANT NOTE REGARDING OUR NEW FIRST-YEAR PROGRAM (IMPLEMENTED SEPTEMBER 2009)

September 2009 marked the implementation of our new First-Year Program. English 111, 112, and 116 have been discontinued, and English 115 has a new title and description. Two new courses –- English 125 and English 135 — have been added. (Descriptions of both the discontinued and the new courses can be found in the Calendar).

For the Degree English Requirement, you may take any two of English 115, 125, or 135, in any order.

If you have already taken English 111, 112, or 116, and you still require a second 3-credit English course, you may take either English 115English 125, or English 135 to fullfil the Degree English Requirement. However, be sure to check with your Program to confirm the required combination of English courses.

English Majors and Minors

The first-year requirements for English Majors and Minors likewise changes to:

Any two of English 115, 125, or 135, in any order.
See the complete description of requirements for Majors and Minors.

View Course Timetable

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