English

  • Program Length 
    4 Years
  • Credential 
    Bachelor Degree
  • Options 
    Honours, Major, Minor
  • Location Offered 
    Nanaimo

The Program

The study of literature is the study of culture itself: the stories and myths, values and ideals, struggles and conflicts that shape our understanding of ourselves as individuals and of our relationships in the world. Courses in the English Department are designed to increase students' literary, cultural, and critical awareness, and help them develop the skills necessary to express their ideas effectively both orally and in writing: in addition to literary studies, we offer courses in writing, rhetoric, and public speaking.

The department offers undergraduate course work at three levels: 100 (University Writing, Literature and Culture, and Literature and Criticism), 200 (University Writing II, Literature and Culture II, Literature and Criticism II, Literature and Traditions II, and Book Club), and 300 (Literature and Writing III, Literature and Culture III, Literature and Traditions III, and Word and Image).

There are also some 400-level courses that focus specifically on professional development, whether for the world of work or graduate school. Students may take them while taking 300-level courses.

All 100-level and most 200-level and 300-level English courses require that students write supervised examinations, demonstrating the ability to meet the department’s requirements.

Note: The English Department considers a minimum “C+” (2.33) average in first- and second-year courses to be a reasonable foundation for success in upper-level English courses.

Degree Outcomes

  • enhanced ability to appreciate the aesthetics and pleasures of diverse literary forms
  • recognition of literature as a product and producer of social, cultural, and individual identities
  • advanced analysis and interpretation of primary course material
  • advanced synthesis of relevant scholarly resources
  • ability to integrate critical thinking with secondary resources to produce independent scholarship related to course texts and material in writing and presentations
  • refinement of academic writing skills, including development of a voice and prose style appropriate to the discourse situation
  • understanding of the ethics involved with intellectual property and the practice of scholarship
  • ability to participate in a collaborative learning community
Program Outline

Program Outline

Requirements for a Major

Students must fulfill all the Institutional B.A. degree requirements, including courses listed below:

Year 1

Minimum six credits as follows:

  • Any two of the following courses with a minimum grade of "C" in each:
  • Or both of the following courses with a minimum grade of "C" in each:

* Students who complete LBST 111 and LBST 112 to satisfy the Degree English Requirements, and attain a minimum grade of "C" in both, will be considered to have met the prerequisites for all second-year ENGL courses.

Note: The English department recommends that English majors take ENGL 125 and 135.

Year 2

Minimum twelve credits of 200-level English courses from the following categories:

Note: Students who have already completed ENGL 200, 201, and/or other additional credits of 200-level English literature can still use these courses to meet the English Major and Minor requirements.

1. University Writing II

Courses in this category add to the development of the critical thinking and reading, academic and professional writing and research skills introduced in first year. Clustered around specific topics for each course, readings introduce and engage significant contemporary issues and debates. In-class writing workshops provide an opportunity for discussing and practicing key aspects of good writing.
ENGL 203ENGL 204ENGL 207ENGL 208.

2. Literature and Culture II

Courses in this category examine the relationships between literature and its historical, political, and cultural contexts. They may consider questions of literary genre, period, movement, and dominant themes or explore the boundaries of literary convention and approaches to literature speaking either to specialized tastes or to alternative interpretive communities. The study of cultural differences enriches students' understanding of their own and other cultures. Courses emphasize reading, research, and writing. 
ENGL 220ENGL 221ENGL 222ENGL 230ENGL 231ENGL 232 and ENGL 233.

3. Literature and Criticism II

Courses in this category focus on practical applications of reading literature through the lens of critical theory. They explore how different theoretical premises shape our understanding of and writing about literature by introducing students to select contemporary critical theories. Courses may focus on different literary genres, periods, movements, and themes.
ENGL 240.

4. Literature and Traditions II

Courses in this category examine in its historical settings. They may relate current to past practices to understand the present in light of the past and/or to offset the foreignness of the past. They may study literary traditions for their own sake and interest, addressing compelling aspects of tradition. Topics may draw on different literary genres. Courses emphasize reading, research, and writing.
ENGL 273 and ENGL 274.

5. Book Club

This category provides an alternative experience of literature, with some student choice in the selection of readings and a non-genre, period, or theme-based approach. This course is about taking journeys of the mind and daring to be goaded, dismayed, delighted, inspired, and moved. Why do we read? For the love of it.
ENGL 280.

Years 3 and 4

Minimum thirty credits of English courses numbered 300 or above, with a minimum GPA of 2.0 (“C”), including:

  • three credits from Literature and Culture III
    • ENGL 325 - (Topics in Environmental Literature)
    • ENGL 326 - (Topics in Globalization and Literature)
    • ENGL 327 - (Topics in International Literature)
    • ENGL 328 - (Gender and Sexuality in Literature)
    • ENGL 329 - (Topics in Children's and Young Adult Literature)
    • ENGL 330 - (Topics in Speculative Narrative)
    • ENGL 331 - (Topics in West Coast Literature)
    • ENGL 332 - (Topics in Indigenous Literatures)
    • ENGL 333 - (Topics in Post-Colonial Literatures)
    • ENGL 334 - (Topics in Canadian Literature)
    • ENGL 335 - (Survey of Canadian Literature)
  • three credits from Literature and Criticism III
  • twelve credits from Literature and Traditions III, as follows:
    • three credits from pre-1700
      • ENGL 300 - (Backgrounds to English Literature)
      • ENGL 340 - (Topics in Medieval Literature)
      • ENGL 342 - (Topics in Renaissance Literature)
      • ENGL 344 - (Topics in Shakespeare)
      • ENGL 346 - (Topics in 17th-Century Literature)
    • three credits from 1700-1900
      • ENGL 348 - (Topics in 18th-Century Literature)
      • ENGL 350 - (Topics in 19th-Century Literature)
    • six credits from any courses in Literature and Traditions III
  • twelve additional credits from any category of English 300- or 400-level courses.

Note: The English Department recommends that students planning to take graduate studies complete ENGL 490 - (Capstone Project).

Note: All upper-level courses will meet departmental course outcomes, but section content may vary each year at the discretion of the instructor.  Consult the VIU English Department website for detailed course descriptions each year.

Note: Students who have already completed 300- and 400-level English courses before the degree changes implemented in September 2014 can still use these courses to meet the English Major and Minor requirements.

Requirements for a Minor

Students must fulfill all the Institutional B.A. degree requirements, including courses listed below:

Year 1

Minimum six credits as follows:

  • Any two of the following courses with a minimum grade of "C" in each:
  • Or both of the following courses with a minimum grade of "C" in each:

* Students who complete LBST 111 and LBST 112 to satisfy the Degree English Requirements, and attain a minimum grade of "C" in both, will be considered to have met the prerequisites for all second-year ENGL courses.

Year 2

Minimum twelve credits of 200-level English courses from the following categories:

Note: Students who have already completed ENGL 200, 201, and/or other additional credits of 200-level English literature can still use these courses to meet the English Major and Minor requirements.

1. University Writing II

Courses in this category add to the development of the critical thinking and reading, academic and professional writing and research skills introduced in first year. Clustered around specific topics for each course, readings introduce and engage significant contemporary issues and debates. In-class writing workshops provide an opportunity for discussing and practicing key aspects of good writing. 
ENGL 203ENGL 204ENGL 207ENGL 208.

2. Literature and Culture II

Courses in this category examine the relationships between literature and its historical, political, and cultural contexts. They may consider questions of literary genre, period, movement, and dominant themes or explore the boundaries of literary convention and approaches to literature speaking either to specialized tastes or to alternative interpretive communities. The study of cultural differences enriches students' understanding of their own and other cultures. Courses emphasize reading, research, and writing. 
ENGL 220ENGL 221ENGL 222ENGL 230ENGL 231ENGL 232 and ENGL 233.

3. Literature and Criticism II

Courses in this category focus on practical applications of reading literature through the lens of critical theory. They explore how different theoretical premises shape our understanding of and writing about literature by introducing students to select contemporary critical theories. Courses may focus on different literary genres, periods, movements, and themes. 
ENGL 240.

4. Literature and Traditions II

Courses in this category examine literature in its historical settings. They may relate current to past practices to understand the present in light of the past and/or to offset the foreignness of the past. They may study literary traditions for their own sake and interest, addressing compelling aspects of tradition. Topics may draw on different literary genres. Courses emphasize reading, research, and writing. 
ENGL 273 and ENGL 274.

5. Book Club

This category provides an alternative experience of literature, with some student choice in the selection of readings and a non-genre, period, or theme-based approach. This course is about taking journeys of the mind and daring to be goaded, dismayed, delighted, inspired, and moved. Why do we read? For the love of it. 
ENGL 280.

Years 3 and 4:

Minimum eighteen credits of English courses numbered 300 or above, with a minimum GPA of 2.0 ("C"), including:

  • three credits from Literature and Culture III:
    • ENGL 325 - (Topics in Environmental Literature)
    • ENGL 326 - (Topics in Globalization and Literature)
    • ENGL 327 - (Topics in International Literature)
    • ENGL 328 - (Gender and Sexuality in Literature)
    • ENGL 329 - (Topics in Children's and Young Adult Literature)
    • ENGL 330 - (Topics in Speculative Narrative)
    • ENGL 331 - (Topics in West Coast Literature)
    • ENGL 332 - (Topics in Indigenous Literatures)
    • ENGL 333 - (Topics in Post-Colonial Literatures)
    • ENGL 334 - (Topics in Canadian Literature)
    • ENGL 335 - (Survey of Canadian Literature)
  • three credits from Literature and Criticism III:
  • six credits from Literature and Traditions III
    • ENGL 300 - (Backgrounds to English Literature)
    • ENGL 340 - (Topics in Medieval Literature)
    • ENGL 342 - (Topics in Renaissance Literature)
    • ENGL 344 - (Topics in Shakespeare)
    • ENGL 346 - (Topics in 17th-Century Literature)
    • ENGL 348 - (Topics in 18th-Century Literature)
    • ENGL 350 - (Topics in 19th-Century Literature)
    • ENGL 352 - (Topics in 20th- and 21st-Century Literature)
  • six additional credits from any category of English 300- or 400-level courses.

Note: All upper-level courses will meet departmental course outcomes, but section content may vary each year at the discretion of the instructor. Consult the VIU English Department website for detailed course descriptions each year.

Note: Students who have already completed 300- and 400-level English courses before the degree changes implemented in September 2014 can still use these courses to meet the English Major and Minor requirements.

Calendar Description of Courses

For generic descriptions of all English courses, please consult the Online Calendar.

Recommended Electives

Disciplines that complement English are Art HistoryCreative WritingFilm StudiesHistoryLiberal StudiesLinguisticsMedia StudiesPhilosophy, and Women’s Studies. Students should consult with Advisors and the English department on appropriate electives.

English Major or Minor with the Bachelor of Education

For information on admission to the Bachelor of Education program, please contact the Education Advising Office at 250-740-6223.

Updated 
Friday, March 10, 2017
Program Fees
Domestic Fees | International Fees

Domestic Fees

Tuition Fee Schedule

When applying to the program, applicants will be charged a non-refundable application fee.

When applying to graduate, students will be charged a non-refundable graduation and alumni fee.

Some courses have additional fees to pay for extraordinary class–related expenses.

Fees for One Year*

Amount

Tuition (30 credits x $144.86 per credit)

4,345.80

Student Activity fee (30 credits x $5.79 per credit)

173.70

Student Services fee (30 credits x $6.4 per credit)

192.00

VIU Students' Union fee (2 semesters x $76.48 per semester)

152.96

Health and Dental Plan fee ($275 per year)

275.00

Approximate cost for books and supplies for one year

1,500.00

Total

6,639.46

Notes

The Health and Dental Plan fee is in effect only for full–time students at the Nanaimo Campus.  

All fees are subject to change without prior notice.

International Fees

Tuition Fee Schedule

When applying to the program, applicants will be charged a non-refundable application fee.

When applying to graduate, students will be charged a non-refundable graduation and alumni fee.

Some courses have additional fees to pay for extraordinary class–related expenses.

Fees for One Year*

Amount

Tuition (2 semesters x $7620 per semester)

15,240.00

Ancillary Fee (2 semesters x $374.4 per semester)

748.80

VIU Students' Union fee (2 semesters x $76.48 per semester)

152.96

Health and Dental Plan fee ($275 per year)

275.00

Approximate cost for books and supplies for one year

1,500.00

Total

17,916.76

Notes

The above table is based on 15 credits or less per semester. Additional fees of $635.00 per credit will be applied if taking more than 15 credits per semester.

The Health and Dental Plan fee is in effect only for full–time students at the Nanaimo Campus.  

All fees are subject to change without prior notice.

Updated
Saturday, April 1, 2017
Honours Program

The Program

An Honours in English is a program dedicated to the exploration and critical analysis of literature and language. The study of English enhances overall literacy, including written and oral communication, and information literacies. In addition to historical and genre-specific knowledge about literature and culture, students develop intellectual and practical skills, such as critical and creative thinking, and research methods. The study of English also contributes to citizenship and lifelong learning.

The main advantage of an Honours degree in English is that it will help students to see themselves as professionals in the discipline and to better prepare for graduate or professional programs. The required methods course and the research specialization involved in the capstone project anticipate graduate-level research and funding applications that many will make as they graduate from VIU. The capstone project encourages the student to spend more one-on-one with one or two faculty members. These relationships will strengthen the transition to graduate and professional situations.

Program Outline

Requirements for an Honours

Students must fulfill all the Institutional B.A. requirements as outlined in the Calendar, including Degree English requirements. Students must also fulfill all 1st and 2nd year requirements of the B.A. Major in English, and the courses listed below:

Years 3 and 4

Forty-two credits of English courses numbered 300 or above, including:

  • three credits from Literature and Culture III
    • ENGL 325 - (Topics in Environmental Literature)
    • ENGL 326 - (Topics in Globalization and Literature)
    • ENGL 327 - (Topics in International Literature)
    • ENGL 328 - (Gender and Sexuality in Literature)
    • ENGL 329 - (Topics in Children's and Young Adult Literature)
    • ENGL 330 - (Topics in Speculative Narrative)
    • ENGL 331 - (Topics in West Coast Literature)
    • ENGL 332 - (Topics in Indigenous Literatures)
    • ENGL 333 - (Topics in Post-Colonial Literatures)
    • ENGL 334 - (Topics in Canadian Literature)
    • ENGL 335 - (Survey of Canadian Literature)
  • six credits from Literature and Criticism III
  • twelve credits from Literature and Traditions III, as follows:
    • three credits from pre-1700
      • ENGL 300 - (Backgrounds to English Literature)
      • ENGL 340 - (Topics in Medieval Literature)
      • ENGL 342 - (Topics in Renaissance Literature)
      • ENGL 344 - (Topics in Shakespeare)
      • ENGL 346 - (Topics in 17th-Century Literature)
    • three credits from 1700-1900
      • ENGL 348 - (Topics in 18th-Century Literature)
      • ENGL 350 - (Topics in 19th-Century Literature)
    • six credits from any courses in Literature and Traditions III
  • fifteen additional credits from any category of English 300- or 400-level courses, three credits of which must be complementary to the student's capstone project (ENGL 490), chosen in consultation with the department Chair.
  • ENGL 480 - (Research Methods)
  • ENGL 490 - (Capstone Project)

Recommended Electives

Liberal Studies, Creative Writing, History, Media Studies, Philosophy, Women's Studies, Art History, Sociology, Anthropology, Psychology.

Completion Requirements

Honours students need an average GPA of 3.67 (A-) on all 3rd and 4th year courses taken within the discipline in order to graduate from an Honours program.

Residency Requirement

Students are expected to complete at least 27 of the 42 required 300- or 400-level credits at Vancouver Island University, including ENGL 480 and ENGL 490. With the approval of the appropriate Dean and under exceptional circumstances, this amount may be reduced.

Admission Requirements

The general requirement for admission is a GPA of at least 3.67 (A-) on the most recent 45 credits of study.  Admission is limited and meeting the minimum requirements does not guarantee acceptance into the Honours program. Students apply after completing 60 credits of study and will submit a written application with writing sample. Students apply through the Program Chair, who will notify the Degree Advisor of successful applications.

Students interested in pursuing this option should consult with the English department Chair for further advice.

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